terça-feira, 26 de janeiro de 2010

In Search of Vertebrate Origins: Beyond Brain and Bone

EVOLUTION

In Search of Vertebrate Origins: Beyond Brain and Bone

Carl Zimmer*

Science 3 March 2000:
Vol. 287. no. 5458, pp. 1576 - 1579
www.nature.com

Melding genes, neurons, and fossils, a new synthesis overturns long-held ideas about the rise of our favorite lineage and shows how a good theory can propel science--even if it's partly wrong

Walk through the halls of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, and you will see our lopsided bias toward vertebrates on spectacular display. The history of the vertebrates unfolds in hall after hall of magnificent fossils, from dinosaurs to cave bears. Meanwhile, equally magnificent specimens of invertebrates such as Nautilus and giant clams are tucked away in a few smaller, less popular rooms scattered throughout the building. Most museums have a similar split, yet invertebrates make up the vast majority of Earth's animal biomass and include many millions of species, compared to only 42,000 known species of vertebrates. But museums are run by humans, who are most interested in animals like ourselves. And some of the signs of our kinship with reptiles, birds, and fish are obvious to even the most casual visitor: We all have skeletons, complete with backbone and skull, and big, complex brains.

For all the attention lavished on vertebrate evolution, however, just when and how vertebrates arose has long been a mystery. For most of the 20th century, primitive vertebrate fossils seemed a confusing mess, and paleontologists had little luck finding fossils that preserve the earliest hints of brains and bones. The basic anatomy of vertebrates' closest living relatives--which might provide clues to what our earliest ancestors looked like--was worked out over 70 years ago, and anatomical studies since then have yielded few fresh insights. "It made the field pretty stagnant," says Nicholas Holland of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California.

But in the past few years, work in several different disciplines has converged to provide a surprising new picture of the transition from invertebrate to vertebrate, a picture that upsets some previous ideas. Developmental geneticists have begun to uncover the genes that create the body plan in vertebrates and their closest living invertebrate relatives, just as neurobiologists are exploring the detailed neural connections of these seemingly simple animals. And late last year Chinese paleontologists announced the earliest fossils yet found of vertebrates and their close relatives, both dating back to 530 million years ago (Science, 5 November 1999, p. 1064, and 3 December 1999, p. 1829).

These studies suggest that the evolution of the vertebrate brain may have had a surprisingly early start in invertebrate ancestors, long before the evolution of the mineralized skeleton that makes most vertebrates so distinctive. What's more, the skeleton may have arisen in an unexpected form: as teeth. The true innovation that launched the lineage of fish, dinosaurs, and people seems to have been new kinds of embryonic tissue, which could form new sensory organs. That allowed protovertebrates, such as those represented by the new Chinese fossils, to embark on a new way to make a living--as predators. Vertebrate evolution is turning out to be more complex--yet more comprehensible--than scientists ever expected.

Brain and bone together
One way to track vertebrates' evolutionary history is to analyze their closest living relative. Molecular and anatomical research both give this honor to the lancelet Amphioxus, a 5-centimeter-long sliver of a beast that as an adult burrows in sand and filters food from the water. It has little in the way of a skeleton, and its central nervous system consists of a nerve cord with a barely swollen tip. But it does possess vertebrate traits such as gill slits, rows of muscle blocks along its flanks, and a notochord, a stiff rod of tissue that supports the nerve cord along its back. Because of these shared characteristics, biologists classify lancelets and vertebrates together in a phylum called chordates.

Paleontologists have long suspected that vertebrates diverged from a lancelet-like relative sometime in the Cambrian period, which began 545 million years ago. Meanwhile, molecular studies of gene similarities between lancelets and today's vertebrates suggest that the vertebrate lineage goes all the way back to 750 million years ago. But the fossil record provides few clues to help resolve this contradiction, because there are no animal fossils that old and no examples of an intermediate species. Until very recently, the earliest undisputed vertebrates were a mere 475 million years old.

These small, jawless fish with bodies completely covered in bony plates of armor are thought to have dined on sea-floor invertebrates and to have used their armor to defend against predators. Fossils retaining the imprint of the brain reveal that these fish had already evolved many of the major features of modern vertebrate brains, such as divisions into forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain. "There's no question by that date a vertebrate brain had evolved," says Linda Holland, Nicholas Holland's wife and a fellow Scripps biologist.

If these armored fishes represent the earliest vertebrates, they suggest that brains and bone evolved together. Yet lampreys and hagfish, the only jawless fish alive today, are squishy creatures without a speck of armor and scant amounts of cartilage--and are far more primitive than the fossil forms.

With no obvious intermediates among either ancient or living creatures, biologists were hard put to explain the origins of the vertebrate skeleton and nervous system. Then in 1983 two researchers proposed a new theory that provided an intriguing answer to these puzzles. Their insight rested in part on evidence from another discipline: embryology. Glenn Northcutt, now of the University of California, San Diego, and Carl Gans, now at the University of Texas, Austin, argued that the key to vertebrate evolution was the invention of a head, which in turn was made possible by the evolution of a new kind of embryonic cell.

Studies of living vertebrates reveal that as an embryo forms, a sheet of cells on its surface curls up into a tube that sinks into its body. This structure, called the neural tube, eventually becomes the central nervous system, including the brain and spinal cord. Along the edges of the sheet, a special collection of cells called neural crest cells breaks away and wanders around the embryo, helping to shape many structures such as eyes, nose, nerves, head muscles, and skull bones.

It was the neural crest, Gans and Northcutt proposed, that gave vertebrates the flexibility to build a new kind of body, one that included the complex sense organs, big brains, and powerful pumping throats seen for the first time in lampreys and fossil jawless fish. Along with the new body plan came an ecological shift, as vertebrates evolved from small, passive filter feeders to large, active predators that darted about hunting their prey. "If you're a filter feeder, there are real restraints on how big you can get," says Northcutt. "Developmental changes produced new structures and presented the opportunity to the animal to start doing something else."

This developmental revolution, Gans and Northcutt argued, also sparked the origin of bone. Neural crest cells build the electroreceptors that line the bodies of fish; once these receptors evolved, the researchers theorized, neural crest started building mineralized bone around them to insulate them from the rest of the body. Later, the bone spread out to form a protective coat of armor, as seen in the early bony fish.

This comprehensive model "was one of the most important contributions ever made to the question of the origin of the vertebrates," says Nicholas Holland, because it united disparate lines of evidence and challenged scientists to find ways to test it. It would take over a decade, however, before they had the tools to do so. Their findings partly confirm the model--but suggest some surprising revisions to it.

Raising lancelets
Researchers had long been stymied in their efforts to see whether the biology of lancelets supports the Gans-Northcutt model, because no one knew how to rear lancelets in the lab. A partial breakthrough came in the early 1990s, when Nicholas and Linda Holland figured out how to gather sexually mature wild lancelets from off the coast of Florida on summer nights. In the lab, the Hollands apply an electric current to make the lancelets shed eggs and sperm, then the researchers raise the embryos. "The progress that we make is comparatively slow, because if we're really lucky we'll have embryos on a dozen nights," says Linda Holland.

With their meager supply of developing lancelets, the Hollands and others began studying the expression of genes that build the creatures' bodies, using special tags to stain cells expressing the products of known developmental genes. After examining dozens of genes, the picture that emerges is that of a protovertebrate brain. The lancelet doesn't have a true neural crest, but it does have cells in the same position as neural crest cells, and they express some of the same genes that neural crest cells express before they begin to migrate. These cells also migrate, but only as a sheet moving on the surface of an embryo, not as small clusters traveling inside it. "They haven't managed to break loose and wander," says Linda Holland. Their work thus both confirms and refines Gans and Northcutt's notion of the importance of the neural crest. "One innovation of vertebrates is certainly the invention of the wandering neural crest," says Linda Holland. "It opened up the potential to get awfully fancy in the vertebrate head."

What's more, the Hollands and other researchers found evidence that even without a true neural crest, the swollen bud on the front end of the lancelet nerve cord bears a striking similarity to the vertebrate brain. The same genes that organize major regions of the forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain of vertebrates express themselves in a corresponding pattern in this small cluster of cells in the lancelet's nerve cord. It would be tempting to conclude that these patterns are an atlas of the primordial vertebrate brain, but the lancelet genes may actually be performing quite different tasks from the vertebrate genes, even though they're expressed in the same place, cautions Holland.

Slicing the lancelet brain
While the Hollands probe the genetics of lancelet development, University of Saskatchewan biologist Thurston Lacalli is working on a parallel research program to uncover the animal's detailed neuroanatomy. Starting in 1991, Lacalli's technician Jenifer West photographed 2000 cross sections of the front end of the nerve cord in a lancelet larva. Lacalli began painstakingly tracing out the shapes and connections of each of the approximately 300 neurons, combining them into three-dimensional computer reconstructions. The work is slow: So far Lacalli has identified and traced only two-thirds of the neurons and published data on only half of these. For other lancelet researchers, the wait is agonizing. "It's like taking a 747 and chopping it up a millimeter at a time," says Nicholas Holland.

But already Lacalli's work supports the Hollands' claims that the lancelet nerve cord is divided like a vertebrate brain. In the regions of the lancelet nerve cord where the Hollands found forebrain and midbrain genes at work, the neuronal structure matches that of the vertebrate forebrain and midbrain. "When the two lines of evidence point to the same thing, then we have a lot of confidence," says Linda Holland.

Lacalli goes even further, claiming that clusters of neurons in the lancelet brain seem to perform the same functions as their vertebrate counterparts--even though in the lancelet these clusters may be made up of only a handful of neurons. "It's a surprise that it fits into a vertebrate model so neatly," says Lacalli. For example, noting a retinalike pattern of connections near a cluster of pigment cells near the tip of the lancelet, Lacalli claims that the cluster is a single eye, homologous to the paired vertebrate eyes. The lancelet eye is too crude to form images, but Lacalli suspects it can detect moving shadows of predators. And the hairlike projections that ring the lancelet's mouth--used to accept or reject food--are connected to nerves in much the same way as cells in vertebrate taste buds, Lacalli says.

In a paper in press in Acta Zoologica, Lacalli presents an even more dramatic correspondence: He claims that lancelets have a rudimentary limbic system. The vertebrate limbic system, which includes the hypothalamus, monitors the body's internal state, such as its temperature and hormone levels. It then uses this information to control basic behaviors such as when to sleep, when to eat, when to flee, and when to fight. Lacalli has found lancelet neurons whose structure and organization resemble those of vertebrate limbic neurons and that are located in the corresponding parts of the midbrain and forebrain. He suggests that the common ancestor of vertebrates and lancelets used its protolimbic system to switch between its handful of behaviors, such as swimming and feeding. "They fed and they escaped; maybe they even decided to migrate at night. They had [essential] decisions to make. And the way they made these decisions is part of the limbic system," he says.

Other researchers say Lacalli makes a strong case. "Excellent work," says Rudolf Niewenhuys, an expert on the limbic system at the University of Nymegen in the Netherlands. "The very beginning of [the limbic system] is to be found here in [Lacalli's] work, because he shows that there is the precursor of the hypothalamus," a crucial part of the limbic system.

The work of Lacalli, the Hollands, and others suggests that in some basic ways, the vertebrate head is not new. Wandering neural crest may have been a key development in the evolution of the vertebrate nervous system, as Gans and Northcutt argued, but by the time the head arose, some of the fundamental structure of the vertebrate brain was already in place. "The regions of the brain that you and I think with are not there," says Lacalli. "But the regions that motivate us, to determine whether we're going to eat or run away or lie down and rest, those things we see some evidence of."

Predators on the prowl
Northcutt agrees that "there are far more similarities between lancelets and vertebrates than any of us would have believed." But to him the head of vertebrates, with its ability to integrate a host of different signals from the senses, still represents a huge evolutionary and developmental step. "One of the major areas of research that will go on for some time is how the [vertebrate and lancelet] are different. Because it's the difference that becomes critical for understanding vertebrate evolution."

Lancelets, for example, apparently have no sense of smell. One of the parts of the vertebrate brain that's missing from the lancelet nerve cord is the most forward portion of the forebrain, known as the telencephalon, which among other tasks handles signals from the nose.

Such differences add further weight to Gans and Northcutt's idea that early vertebrates shifted from filter-feeding to predation. But instead of a divided brain, one of the key inventions of early vertebrates might well have been a nose. "A lancelet doesn't need to sniff out its prey, but as the early vertebrates became predators, smell became an asset," says Nicholas Holland. They would also benefit from eyes to see prey and sophisticated control of their bodies to chase prey down.

In the past 6 months paleontologists may have captured that crucial step from filter-feeding to active predation. Last November, Chinese researchers reported a trove of 300 specimens of a creature called Haikouella. In some ways these sliver-shaped impressions on ancient rocks look like lancelets, but they also have a few key vertebrate traits unnecessary for filter feeders, such as eyes and muscle blocks. These clues suggest that Haikouella is poised at the transition from invertebrate to vertebrate, closer to vertebrates than even the lancelet.

Some researchers have questioned this close kinship, noting that Haikouella has a few anatomical peculiarities, such as in the organization of its muscle blocks. But overall, these fossils "look like little vertebrates," says Linda Holland. That makes another feature of their anatomy significant: The fossil nerve cord has an even larger swelling than does that of the lancelet. "It has more stuff up front," says Linda Holland. "I'd say they do have a brain." If so, that pushes the origin of a vertebrate-like brain back to more than 530 million years ago. And Haikouella is just the sort of brain-powered, sensory-enhanced predator that Gans and Northcutt predicted 18 years ago.

How bone was born
If Northcutt and Gans's theories about the origin of the vertebrate brain have been borne out, their ideas about bone are taking a real body blow. In an upcoming paper in Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, paleontologists Philip Donoghue of the University of Birmingham, U.K., Peter Forey of the Natural History Museum in London, and Richard Aldridge of the University of Leicester, U.K., create a new evolutionary tree for vertebrates that for the first time incorporates a mysterious group of animals called conodonts. These creatures left behind vast numbers of enigmatic little fossils in the shapes of cones and thorns, ranging in age from 510 million to 220 million years old. Over the years "conodonts have been attributed to almost every major phylum you can think of," says Donoghue. Finally in the 1980s new fossils began to emerge with the conodont elements lodged in soft tissue.

Now researchers envision conodonts as eel-shaped predators with a pair of giant eyes and a gaping mouth filled with the toothlike, bony conodont elements, which are made of dentine and other ingredients of the vertebrate skeleton. This new information seemed to elevate conodonts to the status of chordate predators, but paleontologists have fought over exactly what sort of chordate they might be. Donoghue and his co-workers tried to resolve the debate with a massive study of both fossil and living creatures, analyzing 103 different traits in 17 different groups of chordates, ranging from lancelets to jawed vertebrates. "With the fossils we're dealing with, it's as good as we're going to get for a long time," says Donoghue.

Their results show that after the vertebrate lineage split from lancelets, the first group to branch away were the hagfish; lampreys are only slightly less primitive. Conodonts, surprisingly, turn out to be full-fledged vertebrates, even closer to living jawed fish than to lampreys or hagfish. Only after the rise of conodonts did the armored jawless fish, the ostracoderms, appear, and from one of their ranks, the jawed fish eventually evolved.

According to the new tree, hagfish and lampreys offer a good representation of what the most ancient vertebrates were like: unarmored and without mineralized skeletons. And conodonts represent the first appearance of a mineralized skeleton. "The conodont skeleton is the primitive vertebrate skeleton," says Donoghue. And it's not the sort of skeleton Gans and Northcutt predicted, notes conodont expert Mark Purnell of the University of Leicester, who calls the results "significant." Mineralization began not in the skin of fish but in the mouths of conodonts, and it presumably made them fiercer predators.

"I think they have good evidence that that is the case, and if it is the case there are some very, very important things there," says Northcutt. "Much of the story Carl [Gans] and I put together has to be wrong," at least when it comes to the evolution of bone.

The conclusion that bone was born after the rise of vertebrates is not yet certain, as more primitive chordates may turn out to have possessed the precursors of conodont mouth parts. Hagfish have "toothlets" made of keratin plus a little phosphate, which might have originated as genuine dentine-based teeth and shifted to other materials later. And Jun-Yuan Chen of the Nanjing Institute of Palaeontology and Geology in Nanjing, China, and his colleagues claim that Haikouella had mineralized "pharyngeal teeth" in its throat. Whether these so-called teeth have anything to do with the rise of the vertebrates will have to wait for microscopic analyses of the fossils and for an end to the debate over whether they are chordates at all.

Although these open questions remain, scientists are no longer resigned to the idea that they will never be answered. Now that the stream of data about the origin of vertebrates has started flowing, it shows no sign of slowing down. Museums may never mount a major exhibit about the neural crest, but fitting the developmental data with genetics and paleontology, as Gans and Northcutt first did years ago, is beginning to create a much more satisfying picture of how our favorite group of animals came to be. "I think we're going to see exciting new data in all three fields," says Northcutt.

ADDITIONAL READING

P. C. J. Donoghue et al., "Conodont affinity and chordate phylogeny," Biological Reviews, in press.

L. Z. Holland and N. D. Holland, "Chordate origins of the vertebrate central nervous system," Current Opinion in Neurology 9, 596 (1999).

T. C. Lacalli and S. J. Kelly, "The infundibular balance organ in Amphioxus larvae and related aspects of cerebral vesicle organization," Acta Zoologica 81, 37 (2000).

R. Glenn Northcutt, "The agnathan ark: The origin of craniate brains," Brain, Behavior, and Evolution 48, 237 (1996)
PALEONTOLOGY:

Fossils Give Glimpse of Old Mother Lamprey


Carl Zimmer*

Evolution went on a creative spree about 540 million years ago. Over the course of less than 20 million years during the Early Cambrian period, a huge diversity of animals appeared for the first time, including many of the major groups living today, such as arthropods, mollusks, and various sorts of worms. Notably missing from this party--known as the Cambrian explosion--was any member of our own lineage, the vertebrates. Until now the oldest unambiguous vertebrate fossils dated back 475 million years. But this week our genealogy took a giant leap back in time. Chinese and British paleontologists reported in Nature that they have found the fossils of 530-million-year-old vertebrates--fossils that have other paleontologists in awe. "I was absolutely amazed the first time I saw these fossils. They're just unbelievable," says Phillippe Janvier, a paleontologist at the Museum d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris who is an expert on early vertebrates.

You might expect that such ancient creatures would be primitive, transitional forms linking us to our pre-vertebrate past. Yet surprisingly, the fossils are actually full-fledged vertebrates--more advanced, in fact, than some vertebrates alive today. As a result, paleontologists think fossils of even older vertebrates must be waiting to be discovered, perhaps in rocks dating from well before the Cambrian explosion.

The two fossils come from a site in southern China called Chengjiang, already famous for its Cambrian treasures, where the fine-grained rock retains impressions of muscles and other soft tissues. "Chengjiang really takes your breath away," says Simon Conway Morris, a paleontologist at the University of Cambridge. After learning that two different teams of paleontologists, one led by Degan Shu of Northwest University in Xian, had unearthed the vertebrate fossils, Conway Morris traveled to China this April to analyze them with Shu and other Chinese colleagues.

They found that the two fossils represented different species, and although the fossils measured only a couple of centimeters long, the researchers could recognize key vertebrate traits. They had rows of gills, and their muscles were arranged in W-shaped blocks along their flanks, a pattern unique to vertebrates. "They were presumably filter feeders, but they have these muscular bodies and things which we cautiously interpret as an eye," says Conway Morris. "And so presumably they could go along at a fair pace if they had to, and they might have grabbed prey."

The researchers then tried to find a place for the fossils in vertebrate evolution. A number of researchers believe that vertebrates evolved from an ancestor something like Amphioxus, otherwise known as the lancelet. Amphioxus, which lacks eyes or fins and looks rather like a miniature anchovy fillet, has a notochord--a primitive backbone. The first vertebrates added new traits to that body plan, such as a skull with a brain; later vertebrates acquired jaws and fins. The most primitive vertebrate alive today is the hagfish, a jawless fish, and the second-most primitive is the lamprey.

Conway Morris and his colleagues concluded that the fossils fall into a surprisingly advanced position. One of the species, which the researchers named Haikouichthys, is most closely related to the lamprey. The other fossil--tortuously named Myllokunmingia--is more primitive (its gills are simpler), but Conway Morris says it is still a closer relative to us than to the hagfish.

Features seen on both fossils may help answer the controversial question of how early vertebrates evolved the paired fins that later gave rise to arms and legs (Science, 23 April, p. 575). The new fossils show what look like two long folds of tissue running along their underside--exactly what some theories of fin evolution predicted. "We think there's a reasonable case for a double arrangement," says Conway Morris.

Janvier, who has argued that the paired fins came much later, has his doubts. "From what I could see of the fossils, it's not 100% certain." He is also uncertain about the fossils' placement on the vertebrate family tree, because many details of the creatures' anatomy have been lost. He has no doubt that they are vertebrates, but says, "I wouldn't put my money on the exact positions."

If Conway Morris is right about the creatures' sophistication, however, millions of years of vertebrate evolution must have preceded them, reaching back before the Cambrian explosion. Some researchers already suspected as much, based on the clocklike divergence of genes in different animal lineages. According to a new study by Blair Hedges of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, for example, vertebrates got their start 750 million years ago. "Some of my colleagues who take molecular clocks seriously will be skipping for joy" over the new finds, Conway Morris acknowledges ruefully.

He himself doesn't think vertebrates got their start so long ago. He suspects the first ones arose just before the Cambrian Period, about 565 million years ago. The traces of these ancestral creatures, he thinks, may be waiting, still unrecognized, among the fossils known as the Ediacaran fauna. "These stem groups are all lurking down there," Conway Morris maintains, "but we're just too dim to see them."

Carl Zimmer is the author of the book At the Water's Edge.

Explosão de biodiversidade explicada

Explosão de biodiversidade explicada

Microfósseis de conodontes revelam variações da temperatura do mar há quase 500 milhões de anos

Por: Alexander Kellner
Publicado em 05/08/2008 | Atualizado em 08/01/2010


A história de nosso planeta foi marcada por vários momentos em que houve um notável aumento da biodiversidade. Um desses episódios ocorreu durante o período Ordoviciano, entre 490 e 443 milhões de anos atrás. Nesse momento, surgiram os principais grupos que dominaram os mares durante os 250 milhões de anos seguintes, como subgrupos de braquiópodos, equinodermas, trilobitas e corais.
Esse aumento da biodiversidade já era conhecido pelos pesquisadores, mas os fatores por trás dele ainda não eram bem compreendidos. Chegou-se a postular que a queda de um asteróide poderia ter influenciado esse fenômeno. Agora, o mistério – ou pelo menos parte dele – acaba de ser resolvido com um trabalho conduzido por Julie Trotter, da Universidade Nacional da Austrália (Canberra), e publicado na prestigiosa revista científica Science.
A conclusão veio de análises isotópicas realizadas em fósseis de um grupo de animais marinhos do Ordoviciano – os conodontes. A partir desse estudo, o grupo de Trotter concluiu que a temperatura dos mares teria diminuído dos cerca de 40ºC que havia há 490 milhões de anos até valores semelhantes aos atuais (entre 32 e 27ºC) entre 470 e 445 milhões de anos atrás.
Já no final do Ordoviciano (depois de 445 milhões de anos), houve um novo resfriamento dos mares (para menos de 26 ºC), o que desencadeou uma extinção em massa. Não custa lembrar que, naquele momento, os vertebrados eram escassos e ainda não haviam conquistado a terra firme, e que, nos mares, os conodontes eram o grupo mais comum.
Mas o que são afinal esses organismos? Talvez o leitor não acredite, mas ninguém sabia ao certo até há bem pouco tempo. O grupo Conodonta, muito abundante em depósitos marinhos do Cambriano ao Triássico, é conhecido desde 1856. Seu nome é derivado da união dos termos gregos kônos (= cone) e odontos (= dentes).
Até recentemente, esses vertebrados eram conhecidos apenas por pequenas estruturas compostas de apatita (fosfato de cálcio) assemelhadas a dentes (daí o nome), com tamanho entre 0,25 e 2 milímetros. Esses microfósseis têm sido estudados já há bastante tempo e funcionam como uma importante ferramenta na datação relativa de rochas sedimentares e na indústria do petróleo.

Por muito tempo, os pesquisadores debateram se os elementos conodontes pertenciam a vermes, moluscos ou mesmo a plantas. Para se conhecer a resposta, foi preciso esperar até 1983, quando foram encontrados os primeiros registros completos desses animais, mais precisamente de rochas do Carbonífero inferior (com cerca de 340 milhões de anos) da Escócia.
Esses achados estabeleceram que aquelas estruturas pertenciam a peixes bem primitivos, de corpo alongado semelhante ao de vermes, mas com notocorda, estruturas parecidas com barbatanas e um par de olhos bem desenvolvidos. Em geral, os conodontes possuem um tamanho em torno de 4 cm – quase um terço do comprimento de uma caneta esferográfica. Apesar de raros, espécimes completos também foram registrados nos Estados Unidos e na África. No Brasil, elementos conodontes são encontrados particularmente na bacia do Amazonas.

Técnicas e equipamento precisos

Apesar do diminuto tamanho desses seres, a equipe de Julie Trotter conseguiu realizar os estudos isotópicos em mais de 100 exemplares coletados de 20 depósitos distintos, graças a técnicas e equipamentos cada vez mais precisos.
Com isso, foi possível obter uma melhor avaliação da variação da temperatura do mar durante o Ordoviciano. Agora é necessária uma amostragem mais ampla que mostre se a variação foi global ou se há regiões que divergem e como isso se refletiu na biodiversidade.
Como se pode perceber com esse estudo, a vida nos diferentes períodos geológicos era bem distinta. Mesmo que os conodontes tivessem tamanho minúsculo, a contribuição científica que eles trouxeram para o entendimento das variações que ocorreram no nosso planeta pode ser considerada gigantesca! Em resumo, nem só de dinossauros vive o paleontólogo.

segunda-feira, 18 de janeiro de 2010

Ancestral mais antigo do Homem

Uma equipe internacional de cientistas divulgou pela primeira vez um estudo abrangente e extenso sobre o Ardipithecus ramidus, um antigo hominídeo que, há 4,4 milhões de anos, habitava a região hoje conhecida como Etiópia. Ardi, como foi apelidado o esqueleto feminino estudado pela equipe de especialistas, vivia na África um milhão de anos antes de Lucy, a famosa Australopithecus afarensis.

Os especialistas em evolução humana estão constantemente à procura do ancestral comum entre o homo sapiens e o chimpanzé, a espécie mais parecida com humanos hoje existente. Ardi não é este ancestral comum, entretanto, esclarece muito - ao mesmo tempo que surpreende cientistas - sobre o que existiu entre Lucy e o chimpanzé.

"Ardi nos encheu de surpresas, pois apesar de ser um mosaico, apresenta características mais parecidas com às dos humanos do que com às dos chimpanzés", disse C. Owen Lovejoy, professor de antropologia da Kent State University e um dos autores do estudo. Segundo o professor, isto é uma prova de que os chimpanzés evoluíram tanto quanto os humanos nos últimos 6 milhões de anos. "A mão humana de hoje é mais primitiva que a do chimpanzé atual", afirma Lovejoy.

O estudo do Ardipithecus ramidus também sugere que, há quase 5 milhões de anos, estes hominídeos já cooperavam uns com os outros. Em praticamente todos os primatas machos, exceto no caso dos hominídeos, os dentes caninos são grandes, pois servem como armas para ameaçar e atacar oponentes. O Ardipithecus ramidus macho apresentava caninos pequenos que não eram usados como armas em conflitos dentro do grupo. Eles provavelmente viviam em uma sociedade formada por casais específicos. Os machos obtinham e compartilhavam alimentos com as fêmeas que, por sua vez, cooperavam umas com as outras nos cuidados dos bebês. O ancestral de Lucy vivia em uma região silvestre que também era habitada por corujas, papagaios, camundongos, morcegos, ursos, elefantes, entre uma variedade de outros animais. Ardi provavelmente era omnívora e se alimentava de frutas, cogumelos, e, talvez, de alguns animais invertebrados pequenos.

O esqueleto de Ardi, que inclui crânio com dentes, braços, mãos, pélvis, pernas e pés, mostra que ela era uma fêmea grande, medindo cerca de 1,20 m e pesando aproximadamente 50 kg.

Apesar do corpo e do cérebro de Ardi serem semelhantes em tamanho com os de um chimpanzé, ela caminhava ereta e não se balançava entre árvores como os macacos de hoje. Embora fosse bípede, ela podia subir em árvores de modo mais eficiente que os humanos atuais. No entanto, Ardi não era capaz de fazer longas caminhadas.

O primeiro fóssil do Aripithecus ramidus foi descoberto em 1992, perto do vilarejo de Aramis, na Etiópia. Desde então, já foram encontrados 110 fósseis desta espécie, representando 36 indivíduos. Mas Ardi é formada por partes de um esqueleto de um só indivíduo. Os pesquisadores demoraram 17 anos para finalmente divulgarem suas descobertas na edição de outubro da revista Science.

"O que encontramos foi uma cápsula do tempo tão repleta de conteúdos que foi preciso todos estes anos para podermos analisar e relatar nossas descobertas", diz Tim White, professor do Centro de Pesquisa sobre Evolução Humana da Universidade da Califórnia em Berkeley e principal autor do estudo.

"Dois séculos depois do nascimento de Charles Darwin, podemos verificar que ele estava certo. Em ciência é preciso termos evidências e não especular. Valeu a pena esperar para sabermos mais sobre o hominídeo mais próximo do nosso ancestral comum com o chimpanzé até hoje conhecido", afirmou White.

video

quinta-feira, 14 de janeiro de 2010

Como surgiram os dinossauros?

Como surgiram os dinossauros?

Alexander Kellner apresenta em sua primeira coluna de 2010 o estado da arte na pesquisa sobre a origem do mais famoso grupo de répteis fósseis e mostra como novos achados estão ajudando a esclarecer essa questão.

Por: Alexander Kellner

Publicado em 01/01/2010 | Atualizado em 01/01/2010
Como surgiram os dinossauros?


Vamos começar o ano em grande estilo. Além de convocar o leitor para eleger o principal achado da paleontologia em 2009 – a primeira vez que uma iniciativa desse tipo é realizada (veja paleocurta) –, nesta primeira coluna de 2010 abordaremos um dos temas mais interessantes da pesquisa sobre dinossauros: a sua origem.

O momento não poderia ser mais propício, pois nos últimos anos diversos novos fósseis foram encontrados, ajudando os pesquisadores a formular algumas hipóteses sobre quando e onde esses répteis surgiram. Em um grande esforço de apresentar os principais dados sobre essa discussão, colegas brasileiros e argentinos, coordenados por Max Langer (USP-Riberão Preto), publicaram uma extensa revisão sobre o tema na Biological Reviews.

O que é um dinossauro?

Nos últimos anos, a descoberta de novos fósseis ajudou os cientistas a formular hipóteses sobre quando e onde os dinossauros surgiram

O ponto de partida para se estabelecer a origem dos dinossauros é determinar quais são as espécies que devem ser classificadas nesse grupo. Ao criar o termo Dinosauria (que pode ser traduzido como "répteis terríveis") em 1842, o paleontólogo inglês Richard Owen tinha apenas três gêneros em mente: Megalosaurus, Iguanodon e Hylaeosaurus.

Quase 170 anos mais tarde, temos mais de 500 gêneros com 1.000 espécies denominadas, das quais apenas cerca de 700 são consideradas válidas. Talvez o leitor se surpreenda um pouco com essa discrepância, mas o motivo é bem simples: em muitos casos, espécies foram estabelecidas com base em exemplares muito incompletos e fragmentados, cujo estudo posterior demonstrou não possuírem características capazes de permitir a distinção de uma espécie de outra.

O consenso entre os pesquisadores determina que, para ser considerado um dinossauro, o animal obrigatoriamente tem que pertencer a um de dois grupos: Saurischia ou Ornithischia.

As principais características que distinguem os dinossauros dos demais répteis (incluindo os dinossauromorfos basais, que reúnem espécies proximamente relacionadas aos dinossauros) são encontradas, sobretudo, na bacia, pernas e patas. Entre as mais facilmente identificáveis está a região da bacia (pélvis) onde se encaixa a perna, que é chamada de acetábulo. Enquanto os répteis primitivos possuem o acetábulo fechado, coberto por uma parede óssea, os dinossauros – tanto os saurísquios como os ornitísquios – têm o acetábulo perfurado. Até nas aves, que são consideradas dinossauros, pode-se observar um acetábulo perfurado.

Pélvis de dinossauros
Bacia (pélvis) de um réptil primitivo (A), um dinossauro ornitísquio (B) e um dinossauro saurísquio (C). A região onde se encaixa a perna, chamada de acetábulo (ac, em vermelho), é perfurada nos dinossauros, mas coberta por uma lâmina óssea nos répteis primitivos. O osso mais escuro é o púbis, voltado para trás nos ornitísquios (B) e para frente nos saurísquios (C), condição também encontrada nos répteis primitivos (A).

Quando, onde e quem?

Os registros mais antigos confirmados de dinossauros são provenientes de rochas do Triássico, com aproximadamente 230 milhões de anos. Os depósitos principais estão situados na Argentina (Formação Ischigualasto) e no Brasil (Formação Santa Maria). Restos de possíveis dinossauros triássicos foram encontrados em alguns outros países, mas são muito fragmentados, o que dificulta a sua identificação. Assim, o que se pode dizer é que a origem dos dinossauros provavelmente se deu na parte sul do supercontinente Pangeia (que reunia todos os continentes de hoje), talvez no Brasil ou na Argentina.

As principais formas argentinas são Herrerasaurus, Pisanosaurus e Eoraptor, enquanto as brasileiras são Staurikosaurus e Saturnalia. Porém, existem pegadas com cerca de 233 milhões de anos que poderiam pertencer a dinossauros, o que sugere que a origem desses répteis poderia ser ainda mais antiga.
Origem e domínio

Talvez o aspecto mais problemático de toda a discussão esteja centrado na seguinte pergunta: que tipo de réptil deu origem aos dinossauros? As pesquisas apontam que os "répteis terríveis" se desenvolveram a partir de animais relativamente pequenos, presentes em ambientes terrestres há aproximadamente 233 milhões de anos. Existem duas hipóteses concorrentes: esses ‘protodinossauros’ poderiam ser formas bípedes, tais como o Marasuchus, ou formas que se locomoviam (pelo menos em parte do tempo) sobre as quatro patas, como o Silesaurus.

Marasuchus e Silesaurus
Os cientistas discutem se a origem dos dinossauros se deu a partir de formas bípedes, como o ‘Marasuchus’ da Argentina (B), ou de formas quadrúpedes, como o ‘Silesaurus’ da Polônia (A). Ilustrações: ‘Marasuchus’ de Maurílio Oliveira (KELLNER, A.W.A. & CAMPOS, D.A. 2000. Brief review of dinosaur studies and perspectives in Brazil. An. Acad. Brasil. Ci. 72: 509-538); ‘Silesaurus’ de Jerzy Dzik (Dzik, J. 2003 A Beaked Herbivorous Archosaur with Dinosaur Affinities from the Early Late Triassic of Poland. J. Vert. Paleont. 23: 556-574).

Aliás, diga-se de passagem, este último dinossauromorfo basal foi um dos achados mais interessantes dos últimos anos. A descoberta de Silesaurus na Europa (Polônia) demonstra que os répteis que antecederam os dinossauros eram mais diversificados do que se supunha e não estavam restritos à América do Sul (como o Marasuchus da Argentina e o Sacisaurus do Brasil). Sempre é bom relembrar que, durante aquele tempo, os continentes estavam todos juntos (formando a Pangeia), o que facilitava a distribuição dos animais por áreas bem amplas.

Staurikosaurus pricei
Reconstrução de ‘Staurikosaurus pricei’, encontrado em rochas do Triássico da Formação Santa Maria, no Rio Grande do Sul. Essa forma brasileira é um dos mais antigos registros de dinossauros do mundo e surgiu antes do domínio desses répteis na Terra (ilustração: Maurílio Oliveira).

Com base no registro atual dos dinossauros, pode ser estabelecido que apenas cerca de 20 milhões de anos após o seu surgimento esses répteis começaram a dominar os ambientes terrestres. Esse domínio se deu por meio de formas herbívoras como o Plateosaurus da Europa e o Unaysaurus do Brasil e de espécies carnívoras como o Coelophysis e o Tawa da América do Norte – descoberto recentemente.

Mas um ponto parece curioso: apesar dos novos achados, os pesquisadores continuam indecisos com relação às duas hipóteses que procuram explicar o sucesso dos dinossauros. Esses répteis teriam sido mais bem adaptados às condições ambientais da época – particularmente por serem bípedes – ou então tiveram ‘sorte’ e passaram a ocupar nichos ecológicos abertos após a extinção de alguns competidores no final do Triássico?

As pesquisas continuam e, seguramente, as descobertas nos depósitos triássicos do Rio Grande do Sul vão contribuir bastante para as discussões relacionadas à origem dos "répteis terríveis".



Alexander Kellner
Museu Nacional / UFRJ
Academia Brasileira de Ciências

quarta-feira, 13 de janeiro de 2010

Quando os crocodilos dominavam

Com o fim dos dinossauros e monstros marinhos, por que os crocodilianos não tomaram conta da Terra de uma vez?

No verão de 2008, um crocodilo-americano afastou-se da baía de Biscayne, na Flórida, seguiu por um canal repleto de iates ancorados até o afluente bairro de Coral Gables e se instalou no campus da Universidade de Miami, onde vez por outra interrompia seus banhos de sol às margens do lago Osceola para devorar uma tartaruga. Com suas fileiras de dentes tortos e protuberantes, esse crocodilo era um lembrete aos estudantes de que haviam escolhido uma escola na ensolarada e subtropical Flórida. Embora não tenha sido o primeiro crocodilo no campus, ele tornou-se o mais famoso. As pessoas começaram a chamá-lo de Donna - em referência à reitora Donna Shalala -, nome que permaneceu mesmo quando se soube que era um macho. De vez em quando, Donna lagarteava no gramado ao lado do bar dos estudantes, obrigando a mudança de lugar de algumas mesas, mas, fora isso, não causava maiores comoções.
Na madrugada de 1º de outubro, alguém assassinou Donna, ato que escandalizou a comunidade, além de ser um crime: o crocodilo-americano é uma espécie ameaçada, segundo a legislação ambiental. Um mês após o crime, a polícia deteve um homem e um adolescente que queriam o crânio do animal como troféu.
É tentador usar o destino de Donna como metáfora da situação precária em que se encontram as 23 espécies de crocodilianos, um grupo de répteis que inclui os crocodilos, os aligatores, os jacarés e os gaviais. Após sobreviverem a milhões de anos de mudanças climáticas, da dança das cadeiras das placas tectônicas e de outras vicissitudes ecológicas, agora eles enfrentam nova ameaça: nós, os seres humanos.
Na década de 1970, estima-se que a população de crocodilos na Flórida tenha caído para menos de 400 indivíduos. A explosão demográfica humana expulsou os répteis das baías protegidas de água salgada em que viviam e muitos foram mortos por caçadores ilegais atrás de sua pele ou capturados para museus e exibições ao vivo.
Desde então, as medidas de conservação permitiram o aumento do número, hoje em torno de 2 mil espécimes. "O manejo dos animais não é complicado", comenta Steve Klett, administrador do Refúgio Nacional da Fauna Crocodile Lake. "Basta proteger o hábitat e eles se recuperam. O problema é a limitação desses hábitats." No caso de Donna, ele acabou em uma área urbana onde não deveria estar - o problema é que talvez não houvesse alternativa melhor.
Fala-se que os crocodilianos são sobreviventes da era dos dinossauros. Isso é verdade, mas não é tudo - afinal, os crocodilos modernos estão por aí há 80 milhões de anos. Eles são apenas uma amostra das espécies que vagavam pelo planeta e, na verdade, chegaram a dominá-lo.
Os crurotarsos (termo usado pelos paleontólogos para todos os crocodilianos aparentados) surgiram há cerca de 240 milhões de anos, na época dos dinossauros. No período Triássico, os ancestrais do crocodilo evoluíram em ampla gama de formas terrestres, desde animais esguios com membros longos, parecidos com lobos, até imensos e temíveis predadores no topo da cadeia alimentar. Alguns, como o chamado Effigia, caminhavam pelo menos em parte do tempo sobre duas pernas e eram herbívoros. Tão preponderantes eram os crurotarsos em terra que os dinossauros se restringiam aos nichos ecológicos que conseguiam ocupar, mantendo um porte pequeno e populações pouco numerosas.
No fim do Triássico, há 200 milhões de anos, um cataclismo desconhecido eliminou a maioria dos crurotarsos. Com o desaparecimento de seus concorrentes, os dinossauros tomaram conta do planeta. Ao mesmo tempo, enormes predadores aquáticos, como os plesiossauros, evoluíram nos oceanos, limitando o desenvolvimento de outras espécies. Os crocodilianos remanescentes assumiram novas formas, mas sobreviveram, tal como seus descendentes atuais, nos locais a que tinham acesso: rios, pântanos e manguezais.
Os nichos ecológicos restritos podem ter limitado as oportunidades evolutivas, mas, por outro lado, foi a salvação dessas criaturas. Muitas espécies de crocodilianos sobreviveram à maciça extinção do Cretáceo-Terciário (K-T), há 65 milhões de anos, quando a queda de um asteróide desfechou o golpe fatal contra os dinossauros (com exceção das aves, consideradas dinossauros tardios) e contra ampla variedade da fauna terrestre e oceânica. Ninguém sabe por que os crocodilianos se salvaram, mas seus hábitats de água doce talvez sejam uma explicação: as espécies de água doce em geral se saíram melhor, durante a extinção do K-T, que os animais marinhos, que perderam extensos hábitats de pouca profundidade pela queda acentuada no nível do mar. E eles também podem ter sido beneficiados por sua dieta diversificada e pela capacidade, comum aos répteis de sangue frio, de suportar longos períodos sem alimento.
Com o fim dos dinossauros e dos monstros marinhos, por que os crocodilianos não tomaram conta da Terra? Na época, os mamíferos haviam iniciado a marcha evolutiva que os conduziria ao domínio planetário. Com o passar do tempo, as linhas crocodilianas mais divergentes foram se extinguindo, restando apenas as de formas corporais achatadas e membros curtos.
"A grande mudança nos esforços recentes de preservação foi a redução na caça ilegal", diz John Thorbjarnarson, um dos principais especialistas nesses animais. Ela foi substituída pela criação e extração regulamentadas, o que permitiu a recuperação. "Enquanto, há 20 anos, existiam 15 ou 20 espécies em perigo”, diz, “agora são apenas sete, encurraladas pela destruição de seu hábitat." As populações do Pantanal, por exemplo, que chegaram a estar ameaçadas nos anos 1980, após décadas de caça, hoje estão estáveis.
Por outro lado, criaturas como o aligátor-chinês e o crocodilo-filipino foram expulsos de seus antigos territórios pelo avanço da urbanização e da agricultura. E até as espécies que reagiram bem a iniciativas de conservação se defrontam com um problema que é uma versão em maior escala daquele que levou ao fim de Donna: o contato, e o conflito, com os seres humanos.

O gavial-indiano, antes visto desde o Paquistão até Mianmar, sofreu acentuada queda populacional até a década de 1980. Sua recuperação posterior, em função do declínio da caça ilegal e da criação de áreas de preservação, levou os conservacionistas a acreditar que o perigo havia passado. Mas levantamentos recentes mostraram que a quantidade dos répteis voltou a diminuir.

Os gaviais alimentam-se de peixes e dependem de um hábitat específico de rios de correnteza rápida com margens arenosas. Entre os fatores que ocasionaram o decréscimo estão a perseguição por pescadores (que os veem como concorrentes) e a destruição do hábitat para retirada de areia. Além disso, animais no rio Chambal, na Índia, foram dizimados entre dezembro de 2007 e fevereiro de 2008 pela poluição. A população atual está reduzida a poucas centenas de indivíduos na Índia e no Nepal.

Alguns crocodilianos de regiões remotas não correm perigo imediato, e outros, como os aligatores-americanos, conseguiram se recuperar. Mas não sabemos quantos podem sobreviver em um mundo no qual seus lares em terras úmidas são cobiçados - e onde algumas espécies se comportam de maneira assustadora, devorando animais de estimação e até mesmo pessoas. Tido como inspiradores dos antigos mitos sobre dragões, os crocodilianos enfrentaram transformações quase inconcebíveis no planeta e se adaptaram a todas. Com a aceleração nas mudanças ambientais, porém, é daqui para a frente que terão de enfrentar os maiores desafios.

Fóssil Ardi revela novo capítulo da evolução humana

Investigação científica de fósseis Ardipithecus ramidus iniciada na Etiópia há 17 anos revela os primeiros passos evolucionários de nossos ancestrais.

Uma investigação intensiva levou à descoberta de um esqueleto feminino de 4,4 milhões de anos, chamado Ardi. Os resultados dessa pesquisa que começou no deserto da Etiópia há 17 foram publicados na Science de ontem (dia 01/10). Essa descoberta inaugura um novo capítulo da evolução humana, pois revela os primeiros passos evolucionários que nossos ancestrais adotaram após derivarmos de um ancestral comum, os atuais chimpanzés.

"A recente anatomia que descrevemos em nosso trabalho altera fundamentalmente nossa compreensão das origens humanas e sua antiga evolução”, observa o anatomista do projeto e biólogo evolucionário, C. Owen Lovejoy, da Kent State University.

A peça central do esqueleto de Ardi e os outros hominídeos com quem convivia, além das rochas, solo, plantas e animais que constituíam seu mundo, foram analisados em laboratórios do mundo todo. O Ardipithecus era uma criatura das florestas, com um cérebro pequeno, braços longos e pernas curtas. A pélvis e os pés mostram uma forma primitiva de caminhar ereto, porém o Ardipithecus também era capaz de subir em árvores, com seus longos e grandes dedos que lhe permitiam agarrar, assim como os macacos.

Segundo Tim White, co-diretor do projeto e paleontólogo do Centro de Pesquisas em Evolução Humana da University of California, em Berkeley, "O Ardipithecus não é um chimpanzé. Ele não é um humano. Ele é o que costumávamos ser".

Ardi é hoje o esqueleto mais antigo de nosso gênero (hominídeo) da família dos primatas. Essas descobertas revelam os primórdios da evolução humana na África, que precederam o famoso Australopithecus, apelidado de Lucy e ajudam a esclarecer questões sobre como os hominídeos se tornaram bípedes.

“Esses são os resultados de uma missão científica do nosso passado africano”, avalia o co-diretor e geólogo do Laboratório Nacional de Los Alamos, Giday Wolde Gabriel.

O Discovery Channel apresentará no próximo dia 11 de outubro, às 20 hs, um documentário sobre a história do Ardipithecus Ramidus. Discovering Ardi é o resultado de dez anos de colaboração entre o projeto de pesquisas Middle Awash e o Primary Pictures de Atlanta. O diretor Rod Paul e sua equipe trabalharam com os cientistas a fim de revelar detalhes sem precedentes na cobertura dessa revelação do Ardipithecus Ramidus, grande parte realizada na Etiópia.

Por meio das autorizações concedidas pelo governo etíope, as gravações iniciais ocorreram em 1999 e foram seguidas por três filmagens adicionais na área de pesquisas no deserto, além de cenas registradas no Museu Nacional, em Adis-Abeba. Outras tomadas foram realizadas no laboratório do cientista de projetos da Universidade de Tóquio, Gen Suwa, e em locações nos Estados Unidos.

O especial, com estréia mundial inicia sua história com a descoberta, em 1974, do Australopithecus Afarensis, em Hadar, nordeste da Etiópia. Apelidado de “Lucy,” esse esqueleto de 3,2 milhões de anos era, na época, o esqueleto de hominídeo mais antigo já encontrado. Foram necessários 15 anos para que uma equipe internacional de especialistas de elite pudesse ─ delicada, meticulosa e metodicamente ─ remontar Ardi e seu mundo perdido e revelar a sua importância.

terça-feira, 12 de janeiro de 2010

Descobertas rochas mais antigas do planeta

Com 4,28 bilhões de anos, elas trazem pistas importantes sobre a geologia da Terra primitiva

Publicado em 25/09/2008 | Atualizado em 14/10/2009


Foram descobertas no nordeste do Canadá as mais antigas rochas conhecidas da Terra, com idade estimada em 4,28 bilhões de anos. Elas são de uma época em que o planeta tinha poucas centenas de milhões de anos, e têm pelo menos 250 milhões de anos a mais que as rochas mais velhas de que se tinha notícia, encontradas no noroeste do mesmo país. O achado traz pistas valiosas sobre diversos aspectos do passado da Terra.

“Essas rochas vão nos ajudar a entender como os primeiros continentes foram formados e que processos geológicos estavam envolvidos na formação da crosta no início da história da Terra”, diz à CH On-line um dos autores da descoberta, o geólogo Jonathan O'Neil, da Universidade McGill (Canadá).

As amostras foram encontradas em formações com rochas feitas de óxidos de ferro precipitados em águas rasas – que os geólogos chamam de formações ferríferas bandadas. “Algumas dessas rochas trarão importantes informações sobre a atmosfera e os oceanos antigos”, conta O’Neil.

Segundo ele, a descoberta pode desvendar mistérios até mesmo sobre a vida primitiva na Terra. “Alguns geólogos acreditam que a precipitação de ferro nessas rochas provavelmente ocorreu graças à atividade bacteriana”, conta O’Neil. “Se isso estiver correto, essas formações ferríferas bandadas poderiam representar o mais antigo sinal de vida no planeta.”


A composição química do material é semelhante à de rochas vulcânicas alocadas em locais de choque entre placas tectônicas. “Estudar a composição química das rochas ajuda a entender como elas foram formadas e quais eram os processos geológicos que aconteciam”, afirma o geólogo.

Repositório de rochas antigas
As rochas foram apresentadas à comunidade científica em um artigo na revista Science desta semana, que analisa diferentes amostras encontradas, com idade entre 3,8 e 4,28 bilhões de anos. As rochas foram descobertas na região leste da baía de Hudson, no norte da província de Quebec.

As amostras foram recolhidas em um tipo de formação que os geólogos chamam de greenstone belt (cinturão de rochas verdes, em tradução literal). O sítio em questão era considerado pelos especialistas um repositório potencial de rochas antigas.

São raros resquícios da crosta primitiva da Terra, que tem idade estimada em 4,6 bilhões de anos. A maioria desse material foi triturada e reciclada seguidamente no interior do planeta desde a sua formação, em decorrência da dinâmica das placas tectônicas.

“Temos pouquíssimos vestígios da crosta primitiva para analisar e entender a evolução da Terra”, lamenta O'Neil. “Esse cinturão oferece uma oportunidade única para aprimorar nosso conhecimento sobre os primeiros 500 milhões de anos da história do planeta.”


Tatiane Leal
Ciência Hoje On-line
25/09/2008

Fóssil de serpente maior que Tiranossauro

A cobra comia crocodilos e percorria as selvas sul-americanas depois que os dinossauros desapareceram. A descoberta de vestígios fósseis do que seria a maior cobra que já viveu foi anunciada por uma equipe de cientistas internacionais que investigava o norte da Colômbia. Vídeo: Reuters. Narração: Fabiana Uchinaka.

Foi a maior cobra de todos os tempos -- um monstro com o comprimento de um tiranossauro rex, percorrendo as calorosas selvas sul-americanas depois da desaparição dos dinossauros e mantendo-se com uma dieta à base de crocodilos.

Uma equipe científica internacional anunciou na quarta-feira a descoberta, no norte da Colômbia, de vestígios fósseis do que seria a maior cobra que já viveu. Seu nome é Titanoboa cerrejonensis, ou seja, "jiboia titânica de Cerrejón", uma mina de carvão onde os fósseis foram achados.

O animal media de 13 a 15 metros, pesava mais de 1.100 quilos e tinha mais de 1 metro de diâmetro, segundo a descrição publicada na revista Nature. Viveu entre 58 e 60 milhões de anos atrás, quando o reino animal ainda se recuperava da extinção em massa que vitimou dinossauros e muitas outras espécies devido à queda de um asteróide perto da província do Yucatán, no México.

"É uma cobrona impressionante", disse por telefone o paleontólogo Jason Head, da Universidade de Toronto-Mississauga, participante da pesquisa. Acredita-se que a titanoboa fosse na época o maior vertebrado terrestre.

Possivelmente, essa cobra caçava crocodilos, peixes grandes e tartarugas d'água. Ela não era venenosa, e provavelmente tinha uma vida semelhante à das sucuris atuais, que vivem em rios e matam suas presas apertando-as.

"Esse troço era um comedor de crocodilos, apanhando e comendo-os na água", explicou Head. "Era um dia ruim para os crocos."

O ecossistema da época era semelhante ao da Amazônia atual, mas mais quente. Os cientistas estimam que uma cobra desse tamanho precisaria de uma temperatura média de 30C a 34C para sobreviver.

Entre as cobras modernas, a maior semelhança da titanoboa é com a jiboia (Boa constrictor), com a diferença de que tinham o comprimento de um micro-ônibus.

Os cientistas recuperaram vértebras e costelas fossilizadas de 28 espécimes, mas não acharam cabeças nem ossos.

As primeiras cobras apareceram há cerca de 99 milhões de anos. Até então, a maior espécie conhecida era a Gigantophis, que viveu há cerca de 39 milhões de anos no Egito e tinha pelo menos 10 metros de comprimento. A maior cobra da atualidade é a píton reticulada, com estimados 9 metros. video
Explosão de biodiversidade explicada
Microfósseis de conodontes revelam variações da temperatura do mar há quase 500 milhões de anos


A história de nosso planeta foi marcada por vários momentos em que houve um notável aumento da biodiversidade. Um desses episódios ocorreu durante o período Ordoviciano, entre 490 e 443 milhões de anos atrás. Nesse momento, surgiram os principais grupos que dominaram os mares durante os 250 milhões de anos seguintes, como subgrupos de braquiópodos, equinodermas, trilobitas e corais.

Esse aumento da biodiversidade já era conhecido pelos pesquisadores, mas os fatores por trás dele ainda não eram bem compreendidos. Chegou-se a postular que a queda de um asteróide poderia ter influenciado esse fenômeno. Agora, o mistério – ou pelo menos parte dele – acaba de ser resolvido com um trabalho conduzido por Julie Trotter, da Universidade Nacional da Austrália (Canberra), e publicado na prestigiosa revista científica Science.

A conclusão veio de análises isotópicas realizadas em fósseis de um grupo de animais marinhos do Ordoviciano – os conodontes. A partir desse estudo, o grupo de Trotter concluiu que a temperatura dos mares teria diminuído dos cerca de 40ºC que havia há 490 milhões de anos até valores semelhantes aos atuais (entre 32 e 27ºC) entre 470 e 445 milhões de anos atrás.

Já no final do Ordoviciano (depois de 445 milhões de anos), houve um novo resfriamento dos mares (para menos de 26 ºC), o que desencadeou uma extinção em massa. Não custa lembrar que, naquele momento, os vertebrados eram escassos e ainda não haviam conquistado a terra firme, e que, nos mares, os conodontes eram o grupo mais comum.

Ilustres desconhecidos

Mas o que são afinal esses organismos? Talvez o leitor não acredite, mas ninguém sabia ao certo até há bem pouco tempo. O grupo Conodonta, muito abundante em depósitos marinhos do Cambriano ao Triássico, é conhecido desde 1856. Seu nome é derivado da união dos termos gregos kônos (= cone) e odontos (= dentes).

Até recentemente, esses vertebrados eram conhecidos apenas por pequenas estruturas compostas de apatita (fosfato de cálcio) assemelhadas a dentes (daí o nome), com tamanho entre 0,25 e 2 milímetros. Esses microfósseis têm sido estudados já há bastante tempo e funcionam como uma importante ferramenta na datação relativa de rochas sedimentares e na indústria do petróleo.

Por muito tempo, os pesquisadores debateram se os elementos conodontes pertenciam a vermes, moluscos ou mesmo a plantas. Para se conhecer a resposta, foi preciso esperar até 1983, quando foram encontrados os primeiros registros completos desses animais, mais precisamente de rochas do Carbonífero inferior (com cerca de 340 milhões de anos) da Escócia.

Esses achados estabeleceram que aquelas estruturas pertenciam a peixes bem primitivos, de corpo alongado semelhante ao de vermes, mas com notocorda, estruturas parecidas com barbatanas e um par de olhos bem desenvolvidos. Em geral, os conodontes possuem um tamanho em torno de 4 cm – quase um terço do comprimento de uma caneta esferográfica. Apesar de raros, espécimes completos também foram registrados nos Estados Unidos e na África. No Brasil, elementos conodontes são encontrados particularmente na bacia do Amazonas.

Técnicas e equipamento precisos

Apesar do diminuto tamanho desses seres, a equipe de Julie Trotter conseguiu realizar os estudos isotópicos em mais de 100 exemplares coletados de 20 depósitos distintos, graças a técnicas e equipamentos cada vez mais precisos.

Com isso, foi possível obter uma melhor avaliação da variação da temperatura do mar durante o Ordoviciano. Agora é necessária uma amostragem mais ampla que mostre se a variação foi global ou se há regiões que divergem e como isso se refletiu na biodiversidade.

Como se pode perceber com esse estudo, a vida nos diferentes períodos geológicos era bem distinta. Mesmo que os conodontes tivessem tamanho minúsculo, a contribuição científica que eles trouxeram para o entendimento das variações que ocorreram no nosso planeta pode ser considerada gigantesca! Em resumo, nem só de dinossauros vive o paleontólogo...


Alexander Kellner
Museu Nacional / UFRJ
Academia Brasileira de Ciências
05/08/2008

Breve História Da Terra

Nosso planeta tem 4,54 bilhões de anos. Esse longo intervalo de tempo, chamado de tempo geológico, foi dividido pelos cientistas, para fins de estudo e de entendimento da evolução da Terra, em intervalos menores, chamados unidades cronoestratigráficas: éons, eras, períodos, épocas e idades.
A palavra éon significa um intervalo de tempo muito grande, indeterminado. A história da terra está dividida em quatro éons: Hadeano, Arqueano, Proterozóico e Fanerozóico.
Com exceção do Hadeano, todos os éons são divididos em eras. Uma era geológica é caracterizada pelo modo como os continentes e os oceanos se distribuíam e como os seres vivos nela se encontravam.
O período, uma divisão da era, é a unidade fundamental na escala do tempo geológico. Somente as eras do éon Arqueano não são divididas em períodos.
A época é um intervalo menor dentro de um período. Somente os períodos das eras do éon Proterozóico não são divididos em épocas.
A idade, por fim, é a menor divisão do tempo geológico. Ela tem duração máxima de 6 milhões de anos, podendo ter menos de 1 milhão. Somente as épocas mais recentes são divididas em idades.
A essas unidades cronoestratigráficas correspondem unidades cronogeológicas, chamadas, respectivamente, eontema, era, sistema, série e andar.
O quadro a seguir mostra as três maiores divisões do tempo geológico, os éons, eras e períodos. O que aconteceu de mais importante em cada uma dessas fases da história do nosso planeta é o que se verá logo após.
É importante lembrar que os limites que marcam início e fim de períodos geológicos são aproximados e há algumas divergências entre os autores sobre essas cifras.

segunda-feira, 11 de janeiro de 2010

Dinossauros surgiram na América do Sul
11/12/2009

Antecessor do Tiranossauro, descoberto nos Estados Unidos, indica que dinossauros surgiram onde hoje está o continente sul-americano e dali se divergiram e se espalharam pelo mundo (divulgação)
Científica
Agência FAPESP – Um fóssil descoberto no Novo México, nos Estados Unidos, que pertence ao grupo dos terópodes – do qual fazem parte o tiranossauro e o Velocirraptor –, indica que os primeiros dinossauros surgiram na atual América do Sul, de onde se dispersaram pelo mundo.
Comparado com os registros fósseis do Jurássico e do Cretáceo, o retrato da vida dos dinossauros no Triássico Superior não traz a mesma clareza. Sabe-se que os dinossauros se dividiram, nesse último período, em três grupos principais – terópodes, sauropodomorfos e ornitísquia –, mas os fósseis são raros e, quando encontrados, incompletos.
Sterling Nesbitt, da Divisão de Paleontologia do Museu Americano de História Natural, em Nova York, e colegas descrevem em artigo publicado nesta sexta-feira (11/12), na revista Science, esqueletos quase completos de um dinossauro terópode do Triássico Superior.
Os cientistas deram à espécie, que viveu há cerca de 214 milhões de anos, o nome de Tawa hallae. O nome reúne a palavra em hopi (língua de povo indígena norte-americano) para o deus do sol (Tawa) com uma homenagem à paleontóloga amadora Ruth Hall, mulher de Jim Hall, fundador do Ghost Ranch, sítio em que os fósseis foram encontrados.
O dinossauro era carnívoro e media cerca de 2 metros de comprimento e 70 centímetros de altura. Tinha uma mistura de características de espécies que vieram tanto antes como depois. Com os predecessores, compartilhava o formato de sua pelve, por exemplo. Com seus sucessores, dividia características como vértebras com espaços cheios de ar.
A semelhança da pelve com o anterior Herrerassauro, encontrado na Argentina, foi destacada pelos cientistas, uma vez que essa espécie tem sido muito discutida desde que foi encontrada, na década de 1960. O novo estudo afirma que as características que o Herrerassauro compartilha com o Tawa hallae comprovam que o primeiro era também um terópode. O que reforça a teoria da origem sul-americana.
Mas o grupo também analisou as relações evolucionárias da nova espécie com dinossauros conhecidos do Triássico Superior. A partir da complexidade e da diversidades dessas relações, os pesquisadores concluíram que os terópodes então encontrados na América do Norte não eram endêmicos e que seus predecessores possivelmente se originaram na América do Sul.
Foi apenas após a divergência em terópodes, sauropodomorfos (como o Apatossauro) e ornitísquia (como o Triceratops), ocorrida há mais de 220 milhões de anos, que os dinossauros se dispersaram por todo o mundo Triássico, em um momento em que os continentes ainda se encontravam reunidos na Pangea.
O artigo A Complete Skeleton of a Late Triassic Saurischian and the Early Evolution of Dinosaurs, de Sterling Nesbitt e outros, pode ser lido por assinantes da Science em www.sciencemag.org.